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Caspian’s Philip Jamieson and Calvin Joss: Sonic Sculptors
 

A lot of guitar players talk about being “in the zone,” that extreme state of hyper-awareness in which focus and concentration take a backseat to instinct and intuition. For guitarists Philip Jamieson and Calvin Joss, founders of the Massachusetts-based post-rock instrumental band Caspian, being in the zone either onstage or in the rehearsal room sometimes goes one step further.

“There’s a bit of a trance thing that happens,” says Jamieson. “It’s really about us trying to bring in that element of sincerity and let our emotions come out. In order for us to get that across, we have to be in our right minds. Not to sound too New Age or spiritual or anything, but we have to be in touch with ourselves. You can’t fake it.”

“When you’re present and in the moment, it’s easy to be expressive,” Joss explains. “I think you’ve got to be vulnerable, and that allows you to be genuine. For us, it’s not about playing every note, but it’s about how you play them. That’s the expressiveness that comes out in your playing. And if it’s true, you don’t have to think about it.”

A sustained state of cosmic consciousness permeates the 10 tracks on Caspian’s recently released fourth studio album, Dust and Disquiet, on which Jamieson and Joss, along with bandmates Erin Burke-Moran and Jonny Ashburn (guitars), Jani Zubkovs (bass), and Joe Vickers (drums) explore the depths of their four-guitar “wall of sound” approach and come up with something that resembles metaphysical mood music. Produced by Matt Bayles (who helmed the group’s previous record, Waking Season), the set includes extreme grinders (“Arcs of Command”), proggy soundscapes (“Echo and Abyss”), and electronic-tinged epics (“Darkfield”), but also throws listeners a curve with Joss’ emotive, Neil Young-like vocals on the delicate acoustic folk ballad “Run Dry.”

“We definitely took some chances on the record,” says Jamieson, who admits to using 11 months to write and demo “Arc of Command” alone. “Matt was again the perfect producer for us. He’s an excellent traffic cop. He helps split up the division of labor and keeps things rolling smoothly. We have a lot of respect for him, so if he says, ‘Jump,’ we say, ‘How high?’’’

Jamieson and Joss both expanded on how high they jumped creatively during their chat with Premier Guitar—a spirited conversation in which they also dissected the ways they sculpt Caspian’s massive guitar sound, how they shed their shredder pasts, and the thought process the band went through following the unexpected death of founding bassist Chris Friedrich in 2013.

 


http://www.premierguitar.com/articles/23411-caspians-philip-jamieson-and-calvin-joss-sonic-sculptors

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Memories from Berlin’s Iconic 1980s Punk Bars

In this Berlin Experiment, Austrian-born Maria Zastrow describes how she escaped to Berlin's liberating 1980s punk community and became embedded in its lively bar scene, which counted local heroes like Einstürzende Neubauten as well as international stars like David Bowie and Michel Foucault among its constituents.

http://www.electronicbeats.net/memories-from-berlins-iconic-1980s-punk-bars/

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Lester Bangs interviews Eno

From Musician sometime in 1979 - kindly provided by Jon Mattox.
 

Remembering how amazed I'd been to discover that I (who play harmonica and zilch else) could play prime Eno compositions like "The Fat Lady of Limbourg" on piano, I asked him, "How well can you play, say, guitar?"

"Well, I always use the same guitar; I got this guitar years and years ago for nine pounds called a Starway, which I never changed the strings, it's still got the same strings on it. Fripp knows and loves this guitar actually, it's got a tiny little body really small, and the reason I never changed the strings was that I found that the older they were the better they sounded when they went into fuzzbox and things like that. I never used it except through electronics, and the duller the strings were the more that meant they got to sound just like a sine wave, so the more I could do with the sound afterwards. It's only got five strings 'cause the top one broke and I decided not to put it back on: when I play chords I only play bar chords, and the top one always used to cut me there.

"One of the interesting things about having little musical knowledge is that you generate surprising results sometimes; you move to places which you wouldn't do if you knew better, and sometimes that's just what you need. Most of those melodies are me trying to find out what notes fit, and then hitting ones that don't fit in a very interesting way. This happened the other day in this session, when we were working on a piece and I had this idea for the two guitars to play a very quick question and answer, threenotes-threenotes, just like that, and Fripp said, 'That won't fit over these chords.' He played it slowly, what that meant, and it made this terrible crashing discord. So I said, 'You play it, I bet it'll fit,' and it did, and it sounded really nice, too. But you see I think if you have a grasp of theory you tend to cut out certain possibilities like that. 'Cause when he explained it to me I could see quite plainly that technically it didn't fit at all. Each note was a discord with the chord that was there, not one note fitted in almost all the six notes.

"For me it's always contingent on getting a sound, the sound always suggests what kind of melody it should be. So it's always sound first and then the line afterwards. That's why I enjoy working with complicated equipment, because I can just set up a chain of things, like a lot of my things are started just with a rhythm box, but I feed it through so many things that what comes out often sounds very complex and rich, and as soon as I hear a sound it always suggests a mood to me. Now, most sounds that you get easily suggest moods that aren't very interesting; or have already been well-explored. But working this way, I often find that I'll get pictures. I'll say, 'This reminds me of . . . ,'; like 'In Dark Trees' on Another Green World : I can remember how that started and I can remember very clearly the image that I had which was this image of a dark, inky blue forest with moss hanging off and you could hear horses off in the distance all the time, these horses kind of neighing, whinnying . . . "

 

85232154-photo-of-brian-eno-posed-at-hom

 

http://music.hyperreal.org/artists/brian_eno/interviews/musn79.html

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U2 Rock Paris: Bono, Patti Smith Help City Heal at Inspiring Return Show

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PnalyZ_zA6o
 

 

It's been three weeks since the terrorist attacks killed 130 in Paris, but the city is still grieving. You feel it everywhere: in the kindness of taxi drivers, the forgiving nods of usually surly waiters, the quick smiles of people you bump into on the street. On Boulevard Voltaire, near the Bataclan music hall, where 89 people were gunned down during an Eagles for Death Metal concert on November 13th, is an ever-growing mountain of flowers, photos, notes and poems scribbled on rain-streaked paper. Still, an edginess remains: Military personnel with machine guns search the bushes outside the Louvre, and your bag is checked and you are patted down before you enter most public spaces. This is a city at war, even if that war is unlike wars the city has seen before. There are no tanks in the streets, but there could be a suicide bomber at any Metro stop, on any bus. Everyone here knows that, and it gives life in the city a kind of vividness and urgency. It is the kind of moment in history that U2 was born to play for.

 


http://www.rollingstone.com/music/live-reviews/u2-rock-paris-bono-patti-smith-help-city-heal-at-inspiring-return-show-20151207

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Éliane Radigue: The Mysterious Power Of The Infinitesimal

 

http://daily.redbullmusicacademy.com/specials/2015-eliane-radigue-feature/?linkId=19308083

 

 

Éliane Radigue (born January 24, 1932) is a French electronic music composer. She began working in the 1950s and her first compositions were presented in the late 1960s. Until 2000 her work was almost exclusively created on a single synthesizer, the ARP 2500 modular system and tape. Since 2001 she has composed mainly for acoustic instruments.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Éliane_Radigue

 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Czcmpfe_eXE

Edited by Guest

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“Do you remember when you got your magic Les Paul?”

 

So asked Andy Ellis of Peter Green in the November 2000 issue of Guitar Player. The guitar in question was none other than Green’s 1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard, a legendary instrument that the Fleetwood Mac founder used to write and record many of the group’s seminal blues cuts, including “Black Magic Woman,” “Oh Well” and “The Green Manalishi (With the Two-Prong Crown).”

 

Green’s Les Paul was considered “magic” for its out-of-phase sound, a nasal tonality missing from the typical Les Paul repertoire.

 

Oddly, Green didn’t think much of the assessment.

 

“I never had a magic one,” he replied to Ellis. “Mine wasn’t magical.

 

“It might have looked similar to others from a distance, but it was an old-fashioned one with a funny-shaped neck—a kind of semicircle neck. It just barely worked. The pickups were strong, but I took one of them off. I copied Eric [Clapton]. I heard him play one night, and he was on the treble pickup all night long. It sounded so good, I thought I’d take my bass pickup off altogether. Try and wait for the same luck. As if it was luck! It takes a lot of genuine practice and worry to get a sound like that.”

 

 

http://www.guitaraficionado.com/the-deep-secret-behind-peter-greens-magic-1959-les-paul-tone.html

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The Meaningful Of Meaningless. Joseph Nechvatal’s ethics of noise
 

Joseph Nechvatal is an American artist who operates in different fields, such as music (with artists from the NY no wave scene and Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine) and media art. He is known for his research work about the possibilities of using virus/software to generate chaos elements within images.

Nechvatal is not just an artist though, he is also a philosopher and professor, and he published many texts. The most complete and organic one is Immersion into Noise [1]. This is a book created after years of study and it reflects the complexity of a way of conceiving art which is not limited to an aesthetic manifesto about one’s way of doing art. His position is proven by in-depth analysis of the different themes tackled throughout the book: this contributes to making this volume a study with scientific substance. However, Immersion into Noise has been somehow unfortunately kept hidden in the philosophical and essayistic panorama.

The systematic in-depth analysis carried on by Nechvatal always emanates from one point of view: an experience and a perception of art which makes the book very personal. From the very first chapter the author starts sketching transversal lines of his concept of noise, by telling his personal experience at a Hendrix’s concert. On that occasion, he was stricken by the guitar feedbacks used by Hendrix as a self-generative device for noisy signals, which created a constantly exceeding, unexpected and uncontrollable climax. On the one hand, the personal experience helps Nechvatal accounting for the perceptual sensation of what is the main characteristic of noise – the excess – and on the other it helps him mediating the system of artistic production of noise: indeterminacy. It is in fact these two features that help to understanding the view of Nechvatal and of the examples that run through the different chapters of Immersion into Noise.

 


http://www.digicult.it/news/the-meaningful-of-meaningless-letica-del-rumore-di-joseph-nechvatal/

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Read Marc Ribot’s Angry Open Letter To Steve Albini

 

http://www.stereogum.com/1807599/read-marc-ribots-open-letter-to-steve-albini/wheres-the-beef/

 

"Lately, Steve Albini — the veteran producer, Shellac frontman, and longtime underground-rock gadfly — has been saying things about how streaming services are the inevitable next development in the way we listen to music, even going so far as to claim that those services have solved “the problem with music,” making labels irrelevant and removing music from the realm of commodity.

 

[...]

 

Marc Ribot is another underground-music staple, an adventurous New York guitarist who’s done a lot of work with people like Tom Waits, John Zorn, and Elvis Costello. Ribot doesn’t agree with anything Albini has to say and said so in an open letter posted on the Facebook page of the Content Creators Coalition, an artist-run organization “dedicated to economic justice in the digital domain.” Ribot invites Albini to place everything he’s written in the public domain, saying that Albini, if he doesn’t do that, will simply be “another lousy hypocrite shilling for Google and other huge tech corporations.”"

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The Who’s Roger Daltrey: Rock is dead, only rap matters

 

"The Who frontman Roger Daltrey has offered his take on modern music, arguing that rock is “dead” and that rappers are the “only people saying things that matter”.

 

Daltrey, 72, spoke to The Times recently at Desert Trip festival in California, a two-weekend event held at the same site as Coachella and headlined by The Who, as well as Bob Dylan, The Rolling Stones, Paul McCartney, Neil Young and Roger Waters.

 

Reflecting on the genre shift in the current musical climate, Daltrey said: “The sadness for me is that rock has reached a dead end… the only people saying things that matter are the rappers and most pop is meaningless and forgettable."

 

Gene Simmons: 'Rock Is Finally Dead. It Was Murdered'

 

"Neil Young once sang "Rock n' roll can never die," but according to Gene Simmons, it's already dead. The Kiss bassist recently made controversial remarks about Donald Sterling, immigration and depression (which he eventually backed off from), and now the Kiss bassist has another enormous statement to make: "Rock is finally dead," Simmons declared in an interview with Esquire. "The death of rock was not a natural death. Rock did not die of old age. It was murdered," he added. But rock's killer wasn't the blurring of musical genres or lack of craftsmanship. Instead, Simmons blames file sharing and the fact that no one values music "enough to pay you for it" for murdering rock n' roll.

 

"It's very sad for new bands. My heart goes out to them. They just don't have a chance. If you play guitar, it's almost impossible," Simmons tell his son Nick, who interviewed him for Esquire. "You're better off not even learning how to play guitar or write songs, and just singing in the shower and auditioning for The X Factor. And I'm not slamming The X Factor, or pop singers. But where's the next Bob Dylan? Where's the next Beatles? Where are the songwriters? Where are the creators? Many of them now have to work behind the scenes, to prop up pop acts and write their stuff for them."

 

Rock music is dead, says Red Hot Chili Peppers' bassist Flea

 

"Rock music is dead, or at least it is according to Red Hot Chili Peppers’ bassist Flea.

 

The Californian rocker used an interview on SiriusXM’s Pearl Jam Radio to bemoan the current state of rock, saying it was “a dead form in a lot of ways”."

 

The Slow Death of Heavy Metal

 

"These are strange days for classic heavy metal.

 

Many godfathers of the movement are in their 60s, some close to 70 years old, including members of Judas Priest and Black Sabbath. Several hard rock and metal luminaries—Ronnie James Dio, A.J. Pero (Twisted Sister), Jeff Hanneman (Slayer), Lemmy and Phil “Philthy Animal” Taylor (Mötorhead)—have passed away recently. Concert sales for some acts are still strong, others are waning. OzzFest is long gone, and the final nail in the coffin for the annual Mayhem Fest likely landed this past summer. Music sales overall have declined, and over the past decade the Billboard charts, radio airplay and music award broadcasts have been dominated by anemic pop music and hipster rock.

 

To top it off, Brent Hinds, guitarist for old school-style headbangers Mastodon, told Guitar Player earlier last year that he hates playing heavy metal, while KISS bassist Gene Simmons proclaimed that “rock is dead” two years ago."

Edited by red
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"In Guitarist Magazine, june 2003, you said you tried to convince John [Frusciante] to play Fender's replicas of its old models, but he liked the "life" that his old instruments had. Besides the original tuning pegs (replaced by Klusons) and straplocks (replaced by Schallers), is there any other modification that you made in the guitars? He said in a interview that he replaced his '62 Strat pickups for Seymour Duncans SSL-1 (like in his '55 Strat). Is there anything else besides that? When did that occured?

 

"I remember reading that and realizing John was wrong in that interview (I never told him). We were experimenting with a number of different pickups at the time. And he must've gotten confused. The actual pickups we settled on (and John never knew this) were stock, brand new, Fender Strat pickups. The same ones Fender was putting in their brand new American Fender Strats at the time (I'll bet you weren't expecting that)."
 
Edited by red

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https://www.vice.com/ro/article/tipul-care-a-fost-batut-la-metrou-la-unirii-pentru-ca-e-gay

„Poate eram îmbrăcat puțin excentric. Dar ăsta nu e un motiv să ataci lumea", îmi spune Sebastian, la o bere. Cu două zile înainte fusese bătut în plină zi, la metrou, la Unirii. În Bucureștiul lui 2017 încă poți să ți-o iei pentru că i se pare nu-știu-cui că arăți cam gay. Sebastian purta o pereche de pantaloni scurți verzi, un tricou simplu alb, bocanci - și bretele în culorile curcubeului.

 

https://www.vice.com/ro/article/tipul-care-a-fost-batut-la-metrou-la-unirii-pentru-ca-e-gay

Edited by Guest

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https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/news/interviews/mastodons_kelliher_i_left_gibson_because_they_treat_artists_like_shit_that_company_is_falling_apart.html

"It was a lot of reasons.

"I never really felt like I was accepted at Gibson. The communication over there is terrible.

"They kept fucking up my guitars that I was asking for. I didn't ask for a lot - I just had a few certain things that I would like with my guitar - I told them I didn't want it chambered and they made my second guitar chambered.

"All the guys I worked with over there - the A&R guys were getting fired left and right and the company just seemed to be falling apart to me. There were new guys who would come in and they didn't know shit.

"It was a breath of fresh air working with ESP. They were interested and would ask me what gauge strings I played and what tunings I play - Gibson never cared about any of that stuff.

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9 hours ago, red said:

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/news/interviews/mastodons_kelliher_i_left_gibson_because_they_treat_artists_like_shit_that_company_is_falling_apart.html

"It was a lot of reasons.

"I never really felt like I was accepted at Gibson. The communication over there is terrible.

"They kept fucking up my guitars that I was asking for. I didn't ask for a lot - I just had a few certain things that I would like with my guitar - I told them I didn't want it chambered and they made my second guitar chambered.

"All the guys I worked with over there - the A&R guys were getting fired left and right and the company just seemed to be falling apart to me. There were new guys who would come in and they didn't know shit.

"It was a breath of fresh air working with ESP. They were interested and would ask me what gauge strings I played and what tunings I play - Gibson never cared about any of that stuff.

E interesant sa citesti partea asta nevazuta a edorsementului dar e departe de ceva obiectiv. "Rockstars being rockstars". 

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http://www.musicradar.com/news/gibson-responds-to-memphis-factory-sale-news

"Following hot on the heels of last week's breaking news that Gibson is selling its iconic Memphis factory, the US guitar giant has released a statement.

Against a backdrop of gloomy reports on the company's falling sales and mounting debts, the release accentuates the positive, while aiming to reassure locals that the company will remain 'in the greater Memphis area'. The facility, predominantly used to produce Gibson’s semi-hollow and hollowbody instruments, is on the market for $17 million."

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https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/03/17/couple-engage-musical-instrument-stealing-spree-walk-shop-11000/

"As thefts go, the woman caught on CCTV tucking an £11,000 rare guitar inside her fur coat before nonchalantly walking out of a music shop could not have been more brazen. Even as she and her accomplice left Peach Guitars in Colchester they turned to the staff to smile and wave goodbye.

But it has now emerged that the couple is behind a series of thefts of valuable and often rare musical instruments from shops throughout the country and across Europe.

[...]

“We think she was taken to court a few years ago but she got off because she claimed she was not in the country at the time of the offence. I think she’s Romanian.”"

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